Vol. 3, Issue 1, January 2011

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Anger and self-reported delinquency in university students Anger and self-reported delinquency in university students

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Date added: 01/01/2011
Date modified: 09/26/2013
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Clive R. HollinChristopher Marsh; and Claire A. J. Bloxsom

pp. 1-10


Abstract: The association between anger and criminal, particularly violent, behaviour is firmly established in the literature. However, most of the extant research has been conducted with clinical and legally sanctioned forensic populations. The present study sought to examine anger in a non forensic population using a self-report measure of delinquency. The Novaco Anger Scale and Provocation Inventory (NAS-PI; Novaco, 2003) and the Self-Report Delinquency Questionnaire (Elliot & Ageton, 1980) were completed by male and female university students. The total anger score was associated with overall delinquency and specifically with crimes against the person and against property. Males reported higher levels of anger and a greater involvement in criminal acts. The practical implications of the findings within a legal context are discussed.


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The conditions of respect of rules in young and elderly drivers: An exploratory study The conditions of respect of rules in young and elderly drivers: An exploratory study

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Date added: 01/01/2011
Date modified: 09/26/2013
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Sandrine GaymardPhilippe AllainFrançois Osiurak; and Didier Le-Gall

pp. 11-28


Abstract: This study is concerned with the theoretical field of social representations and conditionality of norms. The aim is to study the perception of driving norms by structuring them around individual and group behaviours. We propose to evaluate driving conditionality with the questionnaire based on conditional scenarios. The tool has been proposed to 40 young drivers and 48 elderly drivers. Results show that the driving representation is conditional for the 2 groups, except with the scenario of wearing seat belt. The more conditional scenarios are the same for the 2 groups (scenarios of speed limit and amber light), with higher scores of conditionality for young drivers. The representation of the driving shows that with the system of legal norms (Highway Code), there is a system of social norms related to the actual practices of the users. This study illustrates an important aspect of road safety: the social perception of rules and its impact on driver behaviour.


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Magistrates' beliefs concerning verbal and non-verbal behaviours as indicators of deception Magistrates' beliefs concerning verbal and non-verbal behaviours as indicators of deception

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Date added: 01/01/2011
Date modified: 09/26/2013
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Andrew Brownsell and Ray Bull

pp. 29-46


Abstract: This study examined 105 magistrates’ beliefs about verbal and non-verbal behaviours as indicators of deception/truth-telling and whether their amount of courtroom experience was associated with their beliefs. Previous surveys (none have been on magistrates) suggest that people tend to associate others’ deception with changes in a number of verbal and non-verbal behaviours (that research on actual lying has found not to be valid cues). Overall, the magistrates’ beliefs were not similar to those found in previous surveys; for the majority of behaviours tested, the magisterial sample did not consensually consider that these were indicative of deception/truth-telling. Magisterial experience was related to only six of the 61 survey items, with less experienced magistrates tending to believe that four of the behaviours were possible indicators of deception. Given that the majority of magistrates did not share the common false beliefs found in other studies, the main implication of the present study is that they may well be less likely to incorrectly discriminate between witnesses/defendants who are telling the truth and those who are lying.


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Child court hearings in family cases: Assessment questionnaire of child needs during pre-trial proceedings Child court hearings in family cases: Assessment questionnaire of child needs during pre-trial proceedings

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Date added: 01/01/2011
Date modified: 09/26/2013
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Joan GuàrdiaMaribel PeróSònia BenítezAdolfo JarneMercedes CasoMila ArchAsunción Molina; and Álvaro Aliaga

pp. 47-76


Abstract: The basis of family law is the child’s interest. This is related to the right to be listened to, but not as an obligation. As a consequence, there is a necessity for the judge to conduct a judicial exploration of the child. But, in general, the judges are not trained in this type of explorations, and they may consequently obtain erroneous information in their exploration. Therefore, in this work, we present the generation of a questionnaire that explores the judicial agents’ necessities during judicial exploration of children. Five expert researchers in the subject participated in creating the questionnaire; five family judges participated in the pilot test; and in the final study, 63 family judges answered the final questionnaire. Global reliability was adequate (.858), as was the reliability for interviewer’s skills, but it was not for the other areas of the questionnaire. An exploratory factor analysis showed a factor structure consisting of 5 factors that accounted for 46.12% of the total variance, but these five factors don’t correspond to the factors provided by experts. But construct validity validated the structure provided by the experts (c2/df = 1.35; BBNNFI = .873; CFI = .879; IFI = .881; RMR = .139; SRMR = .153; RMSEA = .075). To sum up, we can say that the questionnaire could be improved, but the best areas are the stages of the interview and the interviewer’s skills.


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In search of psychosocial variables linked to the recidivism in young offenders In search of psychosocial variables linked to the recidivism in young offenders

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Date added: 01/01/2011
Date modified: 09/26/2013
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Lourdes ContrerasVirginia Molina; and María del Carmen Cano

pp. 77-88


Abstract: Most of the literature on juvenile delinquency is aimed to the identification of the protective and risk factors of the antisocial and criminal behaviors. In this line, a study was carried out to assess whether the family setting, personal variables of the youngster and variables linked to the judicial measure execution mediate in recidivism. For this reason, all the closed judicial files of the young offenders from the Service of Juvenile Justice in Jaén (Spain) have been analysed. The results showed that such family setting variables as broken homes, large families, low incomes, deprived neighborhoods, criminal records, drug abuse, children protection records and crime legitimacy are linked to recidivism. As for personal variables of the youngster, the findings illustrate that re-offenders are characterized by external attribution, deficits in social skills, deficits in self-control, violent behaviors and low tolerance to frustration. In relation to the judicial measure execution variables, data support that the non re-offenders are defined in contrast to re-offenders, by a high compliance with rules and timetables and with the established objectives, as well as a high family involvement during the judicial measure execution. The implications of the results for prevention of recidivism are discussed.


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