Vol. 5, Issue 2, July 2013

Documents

Order by : Name | Date | Hits [ Descendent ]

Are patients with chronic pain and fibromyalgia correctly classified by MMPI-2 validity scales and indexes? Are patients with chronic pain and fibromyalgia correctly classified by MMPI-2 validity scales and indexes?

hot!
Date added: 07/01/2013
Date modified: 05/30/2014
Filesize: 237.83 kB
Downloads: 2568

Alfonso Palmer; Carmen Borrás; Javier Pérez-Pareja;

Albert Sesé; and Manuel Vilariño

pp. 123-129


Abstract: A study was designed to find out whether MMPI-2 validity scales and indexes differentiate between true fibromyalgia sufferers, patients with chronic organic pain and normal people, as well as whether they are correctly classified. 105 subjects participated in the study, 27 diagnosed with fibromyalgia and 44 with chronic organic pain and 34 were healthy people, who answered the MMPI-2 following standard instructions. The results showed that fibromyalgia patients scored higher than the control group in the F, Fb, F-K, Fp, Ds, and FBS scales and indexes and that patients with chronic organic pain scored higher in the Ds and FBS scales than the control group. The case study revealed that the F, Fb, F-K, Fp, Ds, and FBS scales and indexes over-diagnose malingering in patients with fibromyalgia, both in comparison with the clinical population and with the normative group. Likewise, patients with chronic organic pain were overdiagnosed as malingerers by all the scales and indexes in comparison with the normative population and by the Fp and FBS scales in comparison with the clinical population. In addition, it was found that at least one of the scales for measuring defensiveness –L, Wsd and Mp– classified 79.5% of the truly ill patients as faking good. The implications for clinical and forensic practice are discussed, as well as for the definition of decision criteria and the (re)classification as true negatives of genuine cases classified as malingerers by the malingering measuring scales and indexes.


Cited by  Web of Knowledge | Google Scholar | Scopus | Related articles


 

Intimate partner violence offenders: Generating a data-based typology of batterers and implications for treatment Intimate partner violence offenders: Generating a data-based typology of batterers and implications for treatment

hot!
Date added: 07/01/2013
Date modified: 09/26/2013
Filesize: 328.97 kB
Downloads: 2318

Olga Cunha; and Rui Abrunhosa Gonçalves

pp. 131-139


Abstract: Different studies have proposed that batterers can be classified into distinct groups according to psychopathology, violence severity and frequency. The aim of the current study was to define a data-based batterer’s typology and its implications for rehabilitation. Data were collected from 187 male sentenced for intimate partner violence –111 of them to prison and 76 to community service. A cluster analysis supported a three-cluster solution: non-pathological (NP, 40%), antisocial/violent (AV, 27%) and disturbed batterers (DB, 33%). Subsequent analysis showed that AV batterers were profiled through the perpetration of physical and psychological violence, antisocial behaviour, deviant lifestyle, criminal records, inter parental violence and drug abuse; DB batterers, were profiled through behaviours of psychological violence, physical aggression and hostility, clinical symptomatology (e.g., somatisation, depression, anxiety, paranoid ideation), criminal records, antisocial behaviour, and a deviant lifestyle; and NP batterers were not profiled through any of the variables related to criminality and recidivism. Multinomial logistic regression supported different logistic models for batterer types in terms of psychopathological, antisocial and perpetrated violence-type variables. Implications of batterer typology on treatment are discussed.


Cited by  Web of Knowledge | Google Scholar | Scopus | Related articles


Interviewing young adolescent suspects: When to reveal incriminating information? Interviewing young adolescent suspects: When to reveal incriminating information?

hot!
Date added: 07/01/2013
Date modified: 09/26/2013
Filesize: 289.4 kB
Downloads: 1863

Jamie Lingwood; and Ray Bull

pp. 141-146


Abstract: Recent research has demonstrated that the way in which interviewers reveal information/evidence to interviewees/suspects can produce noticeable differences between truthful and deceptive verbal statements. However, very little of this research has involved adolescents. In the present study, 12 to 14 year old adolescents were asked to commit (n = 26) or not to commit (n = 26) a mock crime and at interview to deny involvement in this crime. Prior to interview some information about each adolescent’s behaviour was made available to the interviewer but this was not enough to enable determination of whether he or she had committed the crime. The interviewer revealed such information either at the beginning of the interview (the ‘traditional method’), at the end of the interview (as pioneered by the ‘SUE’ technique), or gradually. The interviews were analysed for interviewees’ ‘evidence omissions’ and ‘statement-evidence contradictions’. As predicted, liars omitted more crime-related information/details and their statements were significantly more inconsistent with the information/evidence known to/ disclosed by the interviewer. The timing of the interviewer’s evidence revelation had a significant effect on liars’ mentioning during their free recall of some of this information and on the total number of details mentioned in free recall.


Cited by  Web of Knowledge | Google Scholar | Scopus | Related articles


Psychological adjustment and victim-blaming among intimate partner violence offenders: The role of social support and stressful life events Psychological adjustment and victim-blaming among intimate partner violence offenders: The role of social support and stressful life events

hot!
Date added: 07/01/2013
Date modified: 09/26/2013
Filesize: 309.17 kB
Downloads: 3736

Marisol Lila; Enrique Gracia; and Sergio Murgui

pp. 147-153


Abstract: Intimate partner violence offenders often use victim-blaming attributions to explain their own violent behavior. These attributions represent an important challenge for intervention programs for intimatepartner violence offenders. The main objectives of this study were to analyze both the influence of social support and stressful life events on the psychological adjustment (self-esteem and depressive symptomatology) of intimate partner violence offenders and the relationship between offenders’ psychological adjustment and their victim-blaming attributions. The sample consists of 314 men convicted of intimate partner violence who were referred to a community-based intervention program. Results from a structural equation model showed that social support and stressful life events were related to psychological adjustment. Psychological adjustment also was related to victim-blaming attributions among intimate partner violence offenders. A better understanding of the relationships between psychological adjustment of intimate partner violence offenders and its determinants, as well as its impact on victimblaming attributions, may provide support to new intervention strategies. Implications of these results for improving the effectiveness of intervention programs are discussed.


Cited by  Web of Knowledge | Google Scholar | Scopus | Related articles


Is perception of the mainstream legal system homogeneous across ethnic groups? Is perception of the mainstream legal system homogeneous across ethnic groups?

hot!
Date added: 07/01/2013
Date modified: 09/26/2013
Filesize: 230.72 kB
Downloads: 1937

Estefanía Estévez; Marina Rachitskiy; and Carla Rodríguez

pp. 155-161


Abstract: There is a great social debate regarding possible legal privileges favouring some ethnic groups over others in a particular society. This fact may negatively influence citizens’ perceptions about fairness and legitimacy of the mainstream legal system and, thus, compliance with established social norms. The main purpose of the present study was to analyse the perception of the mainstream legal system in citizens belonging to different ethnic groups. In particular, this work had two objectives. First, the purpose was to explore interethnic perceptions of legal authorities and the justice system by examining the following variables: procedural justice, distributive justice, legitimacy of the legal system, contact with police, and reasons for obeying the law. A second objective was to test the predictive power of perceived procedural justice, distributive justice, and contact with police in the subsequent perception of legitimacy across the different ethnic groups. The sample was composed of 351 participants, who were split into two groups: White-Europeans (76.4%) and ethnic minorities (23.6%). Results revealed ethnic group differences in all study variables, showing ethnic minorities a more general negative attitude towards the legal system in terms of procedural justice, distributive justice and legitimacy conceded to the legal system, in comparison with the majority group. Moreover, legitimacy conceded to legal authorities was predicted by procedural justice, but not by distributive justice neither contact with police, in both groups. Practical and policy implications are discussed based on the importance of citizens’ perceptions about the legal authorities in order to legitimate the mainstream legal system.


Cited by  Web of Knowledge | Google Scholar | Scopus | Related articles